Broken Goals, Glorious Plans – the “starving time” of summer

I remember a time when I decided to write daily…to read news articles, blogs, and novels. I created a huge summer reading list for myself – both fiction and non-fiction. I was excited and confident about the goals I’d set for the months ahead. It was a perfect summer project, and I needed one. Then I found out I was pregnant. Every time I tried to read a single sentence, my eyes closed, and I awoke some time later to a closed book, my place lost, and an incredulous 10-year-old. “Mom, you were out,” he said. “I came in here
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Valentine’s Day – Seasons and Immense Joy

I’ve felt like we have been sinking for the past few weeks. My heart has been gripped in a vice of fear and despair. Peace has abandoned me for the moment. I can be happy for just a brief second, and you probably have thought I’m fine, if you’re my friend in real life. I haven’t been. Don’t be deceived; I’m good at keeping up a front. It’s been tumultuous. I won’t go in to it because it’s not beneficial, and my journal has been drained and badgered with all of it. Instead, I’m practicing love and thankfulness. I’m thinking
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2015 – The List

Since I posted my “Hopes for 2015” post, I’ve had at least three people ask me if I would be willing to post the whole list. Initially, I refused. It’s too personal. While I do put myself out there a lot on my blog, posting a list like this names things I hope will happen. What if they don’t, what happens? Will people think I’m a failure if I don’t succeed in all of my aspirations? Will I feel like naming them aloud, making them public, will change them from hopes to resolutions? These are the types of questions I
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Governed by the Memoir

I love a good memoir. They’re raw, funny, sad, and real-ish. I say real-ish because memoirs are given more creative liberty than autobiographies. No one actually remembers all of those conversations, and sometimes what we remember isn’t exactly what happened. However, memoirs are based on truth, or at least the truth according to the individual writing it or according to how the individual perceived it as truth. Sounds vague, right? But the thing I love about a memoir, not only me but we as Americans love, is that the memoir is the embodiment of experience. Here in America, we worship
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Southern Hospitality & Brazil

A few weeks back, during the World Cup, my husband sent me a link to a narrative article titled, “Brazil’s Secret History of Southern Hospitality.” Assuming it had something to do with the World Cup, as he was pretty engrossed in the games, I benched it for a day or two. I enjoy soccer as much as any American (I hope you get the irony here), but I’m not a huge team sports kind of girl. Also, the narrative is long, and I just don’t have that kind of time lately. A few days later, I found myself with ample
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Rules of Civility Book Review

Amor Towles‘ Rules of Civility, set in the late 1930’s to early 1940’s in NYC, is a descriptive portrait of life at the end of the depression. The novel depicts how people were influenced by financial crisis, how some continued to live lavishly, and how others’ lives were ruined because of what they lost during the depression. But the book isn’t just about finances, it also centers around the relationships between men and women from different classes as they struggle to find good jobs, love, and adventure in life. I picked this book up for two reasons: I’m a sucker for
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Knausgaard’s ‘My Struggle’

Has anyone out there been hearing about Norwegian Karl Ove Knausgaard’s 3,600 page, 6-volume autobiographical-novel (is this a thing?) called, My Struggle? In German, it’s ‘Mein Kampf” (sound familiar?). Germany and England wouldn’t even use the title because of how provocative the name. I’ll be honest. I’m skeptical. But a lot of other authors and bookie-folks have been skeptical as well and then couldn’t put the volumes down. In his native-Norway, they’ve even had to declare “Knausgaard-free days,” where people can’t talk about it. Seriously? This is crazy. After listening to this public radio interview with him, I’m quasi-interested, though I doubt I
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2014 Summer Reading List for Ethan

I chose some classic books, some mysteries, and some just plain fun books for Ethan to read this summer. The best thing is that some of them have movie versions, which we will be watching for Family Movie Night. Ethan is currently between 3rd and 4th grades. Ethan’s Summer Reading List The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl Captains Courageous by Rudyard Kipling The Swiss Family Robinson by Johann David Wyss A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle The Tower Treasure – Hardy Boys Book 1 – by Franklin W.
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Potential Summer Reading

Here’s my problem with reading lists: I’m horribly unreliable. I make a list with whole-hearted intentions, but then I discover they were actually half-hearted intentions because another book has struck my fancy and gets thrown into the mix. I end up with too many books to actually read. For example, five days ago I made out a summer reading list based off of another list I made two months ago based off my Goodreads page and Pinterest board. Then yesterday, while talking with a friend, I decided to read yet another book she was telling me about. So here I am
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